Alexis and the Samurai Move Into View

The way into Alexis and the Samurai’s new Move Into View is not a song they wrote, nor is it “Parlez-Nous à Boire.” That Cajun song led to the Cajun indie rock band Sweet Crude that they're a part of, but more central to who Alexis and the Samurai are is their cover of “Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter.” The song didn’t end up in their set or on the album because they had deep insights into it, or because it

Jazz Fest: Friday, May 1 at Jazz Fest

Thursday was a beautiful day to be at the Fair Grounds, and Friday promises to be just as nice. There's a lot to see though, and I'll try to see more than I know I'll make. I'm curious about Paloma Faith, another Motown/American soul-influenced British female singer. On record, she sounds like she's got the voice and good-enough songs. I'm also excited to see the Australian Aboriginal singer Gurrumul on Congo Square.

Swift, Shelton, Lambert to Bayou Country Superfest and Beyond

Monday, Festival Productions announced that Taylor Swift would headline Bayou Country Superfest, which takes place March 22-24, 2015 in Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge. Today, the rest of the talent lineup was announced, and Kenny Chesney and Brantley Gilbert will top the March 23 bill, while Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert will close the festival on Sunday night.

Jazz Fest Preview: Alexis & the Samurai and Part-Time Samurais

New Orleans-native Alexis Marceaux, whose name you may recognize from her stint on NBC’s The Voice, hit her stride with her sophomore album, Orange Moon. It’s a title that conveys both tone and timbre, and the roughly 25-minute record is carried by the gravitational pull of Marceaux's clear, arresting alto.

American Idol After Tyler and J-Lo

This morning I tried to interview American Idol hopefuls that are auditioning today at the New Orleans Arena, but with no luck. I wanted to see if I could gauge their levels of delusion, but to the producers' credit, they had people inside and out of the punishing sun today. Unfortunately, that also meant that they were a safe distance from wiseguys like me. 

Pages