Glen David Andrews Straightens Things Out

Some interviews are easier than others. Glen David Andrews, for instance. Get him started and he'll take it from there. We talked for more than an hour before Christmas outside Cafe Rose Nicaud on Frenchmen Street, and all I needed to do was get out of the way and let him lay out his truth. I asked a few questions including some about the upcoming gig he was doing with Amanda Shaw, but I listened a lot more.

Andrews and Shaw Together Again for Covington Head Start

Glen David Andrews has had to make so many changes in his life that for tonight's gig with Amanda Shaw at d.b.a., he refers to himself as "GDA 2.0." He's back in his regular Monday night slot at d.b.a., but since he has returned from a three-month stint in rehab, he is more focused on his music and has laid off crowd-surfing and similar theatrics when he performs.

Treme: The Wrong People

[Updated] [Spoiler Alert] "When people start thinking that money is the fuckin' answer, you get a whole 'nother set of problems," Big Chief Albert Lambreaux (Clarke Peters) says in the concluding episode of Treme. "Money didn't make New Orleans, not the New Orleans I know, anyway. And money alone ain't going to save it." The relationship between money - or more accurately, the culture that surrounds those who really know how to make it - and New Orleans was one of the major themes this season, just as it was post-Katrina.

Treme: The New New Orleans

[Spoiler Alert] There are ways in which this season of Treme is very specific to its moment - the NOAH story, particularly - but just as the production opened its timeline to include the Memorial Auditorium story that actually took place in 2009, it feels like this season is talking as much about where New Orleans is now as where it was in 2007 and 2008. Perhaps that's because some of the issues we're dealing with now started to come into focus then, or maybe it's because their roots were in this time period.

Treme: Nothing to Fear

[Spoiler alert] "You can't show them you're afraid," Albert Lambreaux (Clarke Peters) says in an episode of Treme that focused on fear. He's dealing with it as he faces chemo, and LaDonna (Khandi Alexander) faces it as she's threatened by friends of her rapist. One of the strengths of this season is how a couple of storylines working similar themes make it possible to see all the stories in their light.

Treme: Here to Help

This week's episode started with an illustration of just how accommodating Galatoire's staff can be, and those were real Galatoire's waiters working the floor on the show. When OffBeat shot its cover photo of Antoinette K-Doe  with the Ernie K-Doe statue dining at Galatoire's in 2006, the waiter who brought Toni Bernette (Melissa Leo) a chair is in the shot. We hadn't planned to involve him; photographer Romney was just going to get Antoinette and K-Doe, but he was so helpful that Romney kept shooting when he brought out food that the kitchen kindly sent out for the shot. 

Treme: The Fat Man

After Hurricane Katrina, Fats Domino became an even more resonant presence in New Orleans because reports of his death were premature too. I tried to interview him at that time, as did many others, but unless you happened by his house at just the right time, he didn't do them. There was a lot of speculation about the cause of his reluctance - illness, self-consciousness, some measure of stage fright being primary among them.

Treme: Wendell Pierce on Preservation

This season of HBO's Treme has dealt explicitly with cultural preservation, whether it's the demolition of the projects that came up this week or the lack of respect for its musical landmarks, highlighted by DJ Davis (Steve Zahn) leading a tour of gated and razed historical sites. When one tourist observes that many historical sites in Chicago were leveled by the wrecking ball, he says, "This is New Orleans. We let it go to hell. Preservation through neglect."

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