Jazz Fest: The Who Show Fighting Spirit

[Updated]  Rain battered the Fair Grounds for a second day, and a prolonged midday rain turned much of the infield to mud. As if on schedule, the rain quit for good near the start of The Who on Jazz Fest’s Acura Stage, and the sun actually shined on “Baba O’Riley.” The Who’s set began woefully as the momentum Keith Moon and John Entwistle generated on “Can’t Explain” was badly needed. “The Seeker” wasn’t an improvement, and “Squeeze Box” was too lightweight to be more than pleasant.

Voodoo Review: Pearl Jam Goes Gleason, Voodoo Goes Noisy

Friday was the first day for Voodoo on City Park's Festival Grounds. On the plus side, you can move more quickly from stage to stage, and there few sad, lonely outposts where bands and fans seemed isolated from the rest of the festival, as could happen on the previous footprint. On the downside, the sound bleed was really rough, particularly on the smaller Flambeau and Carnival stages.

Voodoo Preview: A New Voodoo?

In recent years, Voodoo has at times felt like the festival wants to be something for everybody. This year’s lineup covers less ground. Headliners Pearl Jam, Nine Inch Nails and The Cure have the broad appeal of classic rock (which is what they are in 2013), and Voodoo remains committed to a wide swath of New Orleans music, including Dr. John, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Glen David Andrews, Coyotes, The Revivalists, Quintron and Miss Pussycat, G-Eazy, and Unicorn Fukr.

Last Night: Does Dawes Have Women Issues?

Last night at Tipitina's, I tweeted, "Trying to decide: is Dawes sensitive or patronizing to women? Thoughts?" The question was prompted by singer Taylor Goldsmith's delivery of "Most People," the opening song of the set. He sang:

As she listens very carefully to a room of conversation
She can feel the planet orbiting through space
She hears pieces of arguments, beginnings of jokes
And the odd lines of a song she cannot place

Last Night: Shovels and Rope Rein in Rock Music

Before rock musicians began turning up their amplifiers as loud as they could and roaring into microphones, there was something like what Charleston, South Carolina two-piece Shovels and Rope have. Take a subtle, grungy guitar tone, pair it with a kick drum and snare, and you’ve got the simple framework for married couple Michael Trent’s low croon and Cary Ann Hearst’s sweet, Southern voice to harmonize.

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