Jack White Vs. The 21st Century

To be fair, I’ve never loved Jack White. There have been times when I had to pay attention because he was part of the story of the moment, but that hasn’t been the case since the start of the decade when he seemed energized by his collaborations with Alison Mosshart in The Dead Weather and Brendan Benson in The Raconteurs, and they led to Blunderbuss, his first solo album.

The Shangs' "Golden Hits" Begs to Be Decoded

The Golden Hits of The Shangs sounds gorgeously anachronistic. It’s the X that marks the spot where lounge music, movie soundtracks, girl groups, Syd Barrett, and The Velvet Underground overlap, and an album that is as current now as it will ever be since there’s no time when it would have made more sense. It’s an album that feels like mirage because it’s hard to be sure if The Shangs ever existed as a conventional band.

JD McPherson Finds His Place in Rock, R&B, and Rockabilly

JD McPherson learned much of what he needed to know from punk rock. That’s not obvious on his four albums including 2017’s Undivided Heart and Soul, where his debt to Buddy Holly and the pioneers of rock ’n’ roll, rockabilly, and R&B are far more evident. But punk rock was his gateway drug when he grew up in rural Oklahoma in the 1980s. It got him started playing in bands, and it introduced him to the artists who influenced the bands he liked. 

John Broven Compiles More Than He Writes New Orleans' Musical History

Writer John Swenson has argued that the change many feel in Jazz Fest has more to do with the passing of the generation of artists who defined the festival than the artists who replaced them. Earl King, Eddie Bo, Snooks Eaglin, Ernie K-Doe and Allen Toussaint were all links to the heyday of New Orleans R&B, and without those tangible roots and the distinctly New Orleanian eccentricity each possessed, the festival can’t help but seem more conventional. This year, Dr.

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