Angel Olsen Shows Off Modestly

Angel Olsen’s voice is a force of nature. It’s pained and soothing, soulful and ethereal all at once, a shock to the system of any listener with two functioning eardrums and a beating heart. Her lyrics feel deeply personal, often addressing a past love or an unrequited interest directly in the second person, and when her voice floats out of a pair of speakers (or better yet, headphones), she’s speaking directly to you.

Tysson Aims for Plastic, Not Gold

In 2008, John Michael Rouchell made himself an important part of the New Orleans music story. He recorded and released online a song a week for a year, and the musicians he worked with evolved into the band MyNameIsJohnMichael. The album culled from the best of those tracks, The People That Come and Go, found a spot where the folky, working class, storytelling songwriting of someone like Bruce Springsteen met indie rock.

"American Band," a Very British Band, and Bryson Tiller Wants to Explain

The Drive-By Truckers’ recent albums resembled the output of a mid-career contemporary novelist—well-observed, well-crafted, but slightly dour with differences between them that meant more to the Truckers than their audience. Yesterday I turned to their new album, American Band, to feel some righteous anger, and the album marks a broadening of the band’s stake and focus—one tipped by the album title.

Voodoo News: Black T-Shirt Day A Hit at Voodoo

Saturday was Black T-Shirt Day at Voodoo with a heavy rock lineup topped by Tool, whose black T-shirts were first among impractical equals. Guitar rock is in remission and simply isn’t a force in the marketplace right now, but it still has a dedicated audience. Cage the Elephant looked like it drew as well as Tool—or close—and throughout the day, the hard rock and metal had enough detail to be engaging, unlike the army of bands playing drop-D tunings a decade ago.

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