Girlpool Connects with Vulnerability and Friendship

In the middle of Girlpool’s show last week at Republic, guitarist Cleo Tucker laughed at her bandmate and best friend Harmony Tividad as the two joked about how amazing it would be if Starbucks had a gas station. The audience, a modest crowd clad in baggy jeans, button up shirts, and grunge hair styles, giggled along with the band.

History's a Part of The Meters, Shorty's Jazz Fest Finales

The annual nature of Jazz Fest makes it a perfect time to reflect on how things have changed--not just how the festival or the grounds have changed, or which musicians are no longer with us, but how the acts themselves are different. The Meters’ set Sunday exists in relation to all the other Meters and permutations of Meters members’ shows that I’ve seen—jammy ones, pop ones, metal ones, blues ones, and always funky ones.

Tank and the Bangas Don't Compromise at Jazz Fest

On Saturday at Jazz Fest, Tank and the Bangas didn’t give an inch. They could have put on their most audience-friendly face and presented themselves as humble musicians on stage at the Fair Grounds to simply play some music and make people happy. Instead, They opened with a Frank Zappa-like instrumental while dancers in blue and green body stockings performed synchronized movements with balls—all before Tank joined them in face paint on the Gentilly Stage.

John Broven Compiles More Than He Writes New Orleans' Musical History

Writer John Swenson has argued that the change many feel in Jazz Fest has more to do with the passing of the generation of artists who defined the festival than the artists who replaced them. Earl King, Eddie Bo, Snooks Eaglin, Ernie K-Doe and Allen Toussaint were all links to the heyday of New Orleans R&B, and without those tangible roots and the distinctly New Orleanian eccentricity each possessed, the festival can’t help but seem more conventional. This year, Dr.

Dale Watson was a Fashion Icon Thursday at Jazz Fest

[Revised] Men in the crowd Thursday at Jazz Fest envied Date Watson’s wardrobe. The Texas “Ameripolitan” singer and guitar player performed on the Sheraton New Orleans Fais Do Do Stage dressed in a Johnny Cash-like long, black coat, black vest, and black slacks, and he looked not only sharp but warm. Thursday at the Fair Grounds was the first time I’ve been cold at the festival without also being wet, and I like so many others I made clothing choices based simply on the premise that the rain had passed.

Pages