John Broven Compiles More Than He Writes New Orleans' Musical History

Writer John Swenson has argued that the change many feel in Jazz Fest has more to do with the passing of the generation of artists who defined the festival than the artists who replaced them. Earl King, Eddie Bo, Snooks Eaglin, Ernie K-Doe and Allen Toussaint were all links to the heyday of New Orleans R&B, and without those tangible roots and the distinctly New Orleanian eccentricity each possessed, the festival can’t help but seem more conventional. This year, Dr.

PJ Morton Deals with "Claustrophobia" at Jazz Fest

P.J. Morton has had his feet in a number of musical streams. He grew up in gospel, and saw one possible future that direction. He also signed to Young Money Cash Money, so another possible future laid along the R&B/hip-hop path. His own R&B instincts often lead in a more timeless, Stevie Wonder-like direction, and in the midst of all this he entered the pop world when he joined Maroon 5 in 2012.

Southside Johnny Brings a Little Barroom to Every Gig, Even Jazz Fest

For Bruce Springsteen, being a bar band was a starting point; for Southside Johnny Lyons, it was a destination. Since well before the release of 1976’s I Don’t Want to Go Home by Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes, Southside Johnny has been working clubs the old school way, with the passion, sweat, and belief that the next few hours might be all we get, so we’ve got to live them now.

Day For Night Powers Through, Rain Or Shine

When you think of a music festival in 2016, an abandoned post office doesn’t generally come to mind, so when I learned that Houston’s second annual Day for Night festival would be held at the old Barbara Jordan Post Office building, I was intrigued. A quick perusal of the festival’s website offered a little more insight into the unusual location choice.

"American Band," a Very British Band, and Bryson Tiller Wants to Explain

The Drive-By Truckers’ recent albums resembled the output of a mid-career contemporary novelist—well-observed, well-crafted, but slightly dour with differences between them that meant more to the Truckers than their audience. Yesterday I turned to their new album, American Band, to feel some righteous anger, and the album marks a broadening of the band’s stake and focus—one tipped by the album title.

Voodoo News: Anderson .Paak Slides Up Ladders

Anderson .Paak slid under the industry’s collective radar for a long time. An R&B singer with a raw, unpolished voice and an old-school hip-hop sensibility, he was relegated to the underground for much of his career. Now, at age 30, he’s got a hit record, a spot in the XXL 2016 Freshman Class, and a catalogue of verses for legendary L.A. artists Dr. Dre and Schoolboy Q.

KING's Rule Comes to Tipitina's

The humble origins of rising R&B supergroup KING begin in Minnesota, where sisters Paris and Amber Strother were born into a family of musical talent. While the girls were growing up, their father and uncle held jam sessions in their childhood home, which Paris says was littered with her dad’s various instruments and vinyl records of family favorites including Stevie Wonder, Quincy Jones, and Bobby Brown. “My parents were both big music lovers,” Paris Strother says.

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