Woozy and Pears Team Up for New Video

New Orleans' rock band Woozy is a nominee for Best Debut Album in My Spilt Milk's New Orleans Music Awards for Blistered, of which I wrote, "Singers slide up or down to notes and fight their way through the shitstorm of fuzzed guitars, and the songs amble down paths of their own creation rather than adhere to any conventional verse/chorus structure." 

A Killer Single Introduces the World to Seratones

The short story behind Shreveport’s Seratones is that the members met in a punk club and came together to make a flame-throwing version of garage R&B. It’s a sound that dates back to the MC5, but it’s a bracing, exhilarating sound each time someone revisits it, particularly with A.J. Haynes’ soul shouter vocals up front. Her performance on “Necromancer,” their most recent single on Fat Possum Records, makes you want to go find that Shreveport punk club to see what else might be happening there. 

Voting is Open for our New Orleans Music Awards

[Updated] Early voting has started for March 5’s Louisiana Primary, and it is time to vote for the winners for The My Spilt Milk Awards, which take place Thursday, April 7 at The Howlin’ Wolf. The ballot below includes our nominees as well as space for you to write-in your choice if you think we missed somebody.

Last Night: Best Coast Charts its Emotional State

Best Coast’s Bethany Cosentino’s songs occupy a very specific emotional and geographic space. The band’s name and surf pop sound evoke California, and she sings about a life in California that doesn’t live up to its promise but doesn’t suck either. She’s not bemoaning her beautiful trap as The Eagles did in “Hotel California,” nor does she sound angry and ripped off by what of the state’s legacy was left to her. Instead, Consentino’s lyrical life is defined by ambivalence and uncertainty.

Tusk in a Box

The red-blooded American in me loves a box set. Who doesn’t want lots of stuff, particularly if it’s attractively packaged? But the specifics of a box set are the rub. If you’re a fan of the artist, you likely already have much of the material on the box. If you’re not, buying one is a pricey way into an artist. They also rarely hold up from end to end. There’s frequently a disc that presents the artist in process, or one that honors the later material that only diehard fans care about.

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