Jazz Fest: Catching Up with Aurora Nealand

[Updated We’ll see only part of what Aurora Nealand can do during Jazz Fest. Her trad jazz talents earned her five slots during the two weekends, including Calvin Johnson's Native Son--stories of Sidney Bechet featuring Nealand and Brian "Breeze" Cayolle. That takes place Friday at 2:10 p.m. in the NOLA 300 Cultural Exchange Pavilion and again at 4:20 in the Economy Hall Tent.

Are Soundscapes the Key to Better Sound Management in New Orleans?

Last December, David Woolworth of Roland, Woolworth & Associates organized “A Workshop on Sound for New Orleans.” The city hired Woolworth as an acoustic expert when City Council considered updating the noise ordinance in 2014. A soundwalk he led on Bourbon Street late one afternoon illustrated the simplistic nature of the proposed solution as many Bourbon Street venues violated the proposed decibel threshhold before the crowd arrived and the street got genuinely loud.

The Road to Wrestlemania Slows for Construction

[Updated] On the Road to Wrestlemania this week, the WWE stopped for gas, a Coke, and to hit the head. The matches that weren’t already made were strongly hinted at, and any late fireworks were saved for next week and the go-home shows before Wrestlemania comes to New Orleans April 8. Because of that, this week on Raw and Smackdown Live felt a bit like killing time. 

SZA, Smino Top a Tough Year at Buku

Buku 2018 was a bit of a dumpster fire. The new stage layout separated the Power Plant stage from the other stages by a train track which led to extreme traffic when a train passed through. Mid-performance injuries, delayed and disastrous shows, a  strange fire ignited across the river, and cancellations from Lil Uzi Vert, Ski Mask the Slump God, and Famous Dex were sadly part of this year's Buku story. Some artists came out hot; others were tired or sloppy. Here’s our look into the highs and lows of this year's Buku Fest.

Buku News: Jay Electronica was the Prodigal Son on Saturday Night

Jay Electronica was the prodigal son on Saturday night at Buku, and one of the few rappers who performed up this weekend after Lil Uzi Vert, Ski Mask the Slump God and Famous Dex no-showed. The New Orleans native rapper grew up in the “the Magnolia projects in the Third Ward slum,” to quote Electronica. Essentially homeless, he traveled between Atlanta, New York, Detroit, and Baltimore, befriending other hip-hop artists and deejays.

Buku News: Migos Barely Present on Friday Night

Migos were barely present at Buku on Friday night. The Atlanta rap trio has been churning out hits since their 2013 track “Versace" and climbed the cultural ladder to become arguably the most prominent group in music in the past few years. Their triplet rhythms, fashion sense, and dance move (“the dab”) have been adopted globally, making them a staple of American pop culture.

Buku News: Alison Wonderland, Illenium, and New Thousand

The Buku Project starts Friday at Mardi Gras World with perhaps its most on-time lineup yet. Migos played Saturday Night Live on the weekend, and the band has five songs from Culture II in Billboard's Hot 100 (Little Xan, also playing, has one). Culture II is number three on Billboard's Top 200 album chart, which also includes Buku artists Lil Uzi Vert and SZA.

A Living Soundtrack Soundtracks Life in Japan

Matt Aguiluz of A Living Soundtrack lived in Japan from 2011 to 2013, and while there he was involved in a life-threatening car accident when a passenger van he and his wife were on collided with a dump truck. Two people on the van died and Aguiluz had to be hospitalized with ruptured intestines. That experience led to Tezukayama, the new, half-hour long EP from the electronic duo—the first since 2011. 

Molotov Throws a Cocktail Party at the House of Blues

There was an overwhelming, communal connection when Molotov took the stage at House of Blues' Parish. The Mexican rap-rock/punk band engaged in playful banter with each other and the audience in a performance that was confrontational, vulgar, political, and humorous--all of which was exactly what the audience came to see. Playing visibly drunk under a sign reading Unity in Diversity, the band made it clear that although Latin American politics are a mess, people are stronger when they mosh, yelp, and rock out together.

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