Janet Jackson Remembers Her Father at Essence

{Updated] Keeping the fans in the Superdome has been a challenge for the acts that close the Essence Festival, but Janet Jackson didn’t start to hemorrhage audience members until a lengthy mid-set DJ break. That ended with the band playing “Let’s Wait a While” as an instrumental, which fans took as a chance to sing or leave. Still, once she was back onstage and performing, the exodus slowed significantly.

Guts Club Finds Her New Voice on "Trench Foot"

The one-line story of Guts Club’s new Trench Foot is that Guts Club goes electric. Lindsey Baker is Guts Club, and she remains an indie folkie, but she has traded her acoustic guitar for an electric one, and with it came a band. Despite those changes, the meaningful difference between this album and the ones before it is her voice, and perhaps because it is different, so are the songs.

Belle and Sebastian Get a Hero's Welcome at First New Orleans Show

[Updated] When Stuart Murdoch sang, “We were on the outside looking in” Monday night at The Civic, he could have been articulating Belle and Sebastian’s central thought. The veteran Scottish indie rock band has got 20 years out of tweedy alienation, in part because no one went broke by making young people (and people who were young once) feel dramatic, but also because Belle and Sebastian made it seem beautiful.

Wynton Writes Off Hip-Hop to Washington Post

[Updated] Tuesday, Wynton Marsalis made news when he asserted that hip-hop is more harmful to African Americans than Confederate statues. “I started saying in 1985 I don’t think we should have a music talking about niggers and bitches and hoes,” he told The Washington Post’s Jonathan Capehart on his podcast, “Cape Up.” 

QOTSA, Beach House, Weedie, and "Exile" Play Night Shows During Jazz Fest

The jam wave that followed Phish’s first appearance at Jazz Fest changed New Orleans’ nightlife during the festival, for years turning it into a place where the members of Lettuce are royalty, Grateful Dead-like jams take place nightly, and friendships made on the Jam Cruise find a stage. Funky jazz rock, rocky jazz funk, and jazzy funk rock have been the dominant sound for a decade, but this year featured some shows that acknowledged the broader spectrum of music. On Friday, April 27, the festival closed with sets by Sting and Sturgill Simpson.

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