Anderson .Paak Didn't Need the Weather to Generate Heat at Champions Square

Anderson .Paak knows that his face is his money. He named the tour that brought him to Champions Square Saturday night “The Best Teef in the Game Tour,” and he showed off his fine set of choppers all show. His face is so important that he mounted a camera on his drum kit so that even when he was playing, we could see him. 

Julia Jacklin Is Comfortable In New Orleans

Julia Jacklin ended where she started. Her last stop of tour was in New Orleans at Gasa Gasa on Thursday, and she revealed to the packed venue that New Orleans holds special significance for the blossoming of the Australian songwriter's musical career. She also showed how well she understands her own talents as she performed to her exact vocal and emotional range. The Gasa Gasa audience allowed her to fill the space exactly as she needed.

Dr. John and the Importance of Making Groceries

Dr. John’s most enduring mode was translator of New Orleans. He covered a few careers’ worth of musical ground and was never simply anything, but after 1972’s Gumbo, that was his gig—to help the rest of the country understand his hometown. Its history, its reality, and its romance. That role resonated in a way that psychedelic explorer of the alternative spiritual planes didn’t, and it was a role that left him room to grow.

Paul McCartney Still Goes to Work

[Updated] I give Paul McCartney credit. He doesn’t have to try this hard. He’s wealthy in ways few of us can imagine, and he has been knighted. He’s 76 and only Bob Dylan among his contemporaries tours as frequently. McCartney could lay out on the island of his choosing for the rest of his life, but instead he’s on yet another world tour, and flew from Brazil to New Orleans to play the first show of his North American tour Thursday night at the Smoothie King Center. 

Lucy Dacus Is Just Getting Started

It’s difficult to stop an audience in its tracks with an unrecorded song, but Lucy Dacus has done it both times I’ve seen her. Months ago in Chicago while on tour with boygenius--Dacus, Phoebe Bridgers, and Julien Baker--she opened with a brand new, unrecorded song called “Fool’s Gold.” She performed it solo, alone with her guitar, and I was crying before the end of the first song of the first set of a stacked, emotionally gutting bill.

TV Girl Has A Problem With Women

I discovered TV Girl last year after the release of their third album, Death of a Party Girl. It’s a breezy listen of indie pop soaked in easygoing, lo-fi dynamics. The California natives, Brad Petering, Jason Wyman, Wyatt Harmon, describe their music as “hypnotic pop.” Heavily reliant on electro-synths and cinematic samples, TV Girl’s music is a soundtrack to a lazy summer day.

Shorty, Nevilles Belatedly Pass the Torch at Jazz Fest

Jazz Fest producer Quint Davis introduced the festival-closing set by saying that three acts had closed the fest on what is now the Acura Stage—Professor Longhair, the Neville Brothers, and Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue—and that two of the three were coming up. There were a few other acts between Longhair’s death in 1980 and 1986 when the Neville Brothers took up residency in that spot, but the time slot has been associated with the Neville Brothers and Shorty for more than 30 years.

Adia Victoria Is Surviving Through the Blues

Adia Victoria is reclaiming her Southerness by reclaiming the blues. The blues she’s accessing aren't the “he done me wrong” blues; they're sinister and wicked, something deeply Southern and born out of trauma. She is currently touring for her second album, Silences, which is a haunting, lyrical exploration of survival, with a stop in New Orleans on Monday, May 6 at Gasa Gasa.

Bob Weir throwback for the Jazz Fest Deadheads

Jazz Fest season sees the annual return of followers of all things Grateful Dead to New Orleans as the festival and its accompanying nightlife still steers into the jam aesthetic that the band made its signature. In March, photographer Erika Goldring shot Dead guitarist Bob Weir last March when he came to New Orleans to play The Fillmore with The Wolf Brothers--Don Was on bass and Ratdog's Jay Lane on drums.

Leyla McCalla Brings Her New Community to Jazz Fest

Leyla McCalla has largely conducted her career as a lone wolf, performing with just her cello or her banjo, or on occasion a second voice or instrument. Many people first encountered her as a member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, but that was a fairly intimate acoustic ensemble, and her first two solo albums—Vari-Colored Songs and A Day for the Hunter, A Day for the Prey—are defined by her instrument and singing as she explored her Haitian Creole heritage.

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