Jason Jordan's Angle Got Real in the WWE

Maybe the WWE always intended for Jason Jordan to become a heel. Maybe when Kurt Angle announced that then-member of American Alpha was his illegitimate son, WWE writers knew that crowds wouldn’t buy it or him. They certainly reacted to him with suspicious indifference, then wariness. Theoretically, he was a babyface, but once he became Seth Rollins’ tag team partner, Jordan got real heel heat, particularly as his serial bumbling cost them the tag team belt.

The WWE's MMC Makes FB Must-See TV

The WWE Mixed Match Challenge sounds like a gimmicky way for the WWE to get in on a gimmicky platform, Facebook’s new Facebook Live. Instead, it has been a pleasant surprise and a reminder of what the WWE does well. The series is a tournament of male-female tag team matches, each wrestling for a charity, and while such tag matches are often frustrating because they present non-committal wrestling, here they succeed because they’re all about personas.

Wrestlers Now Need to Run Lines as Well as Ropes

[Updated] Two weeks ago, the WWE introduced the same angle on Raw and Smackdown Live. New three-woman squads joined the shows’ rosters and established themselves as disruptive forces. The sequences rocked in the way that new arrivals do, but this week started the hard business—making them parts of their shows. In each case, the results were mixed.

WWE Brings in New Women Rather than Write for the Ones it Has

Last week, two teams of newcomers shook up up the Raw and Smackdown Live women’s divisions. Monday night on Raw, Paige returned and brought with her Mandy Rose and Sonya Deville. The next night, Ruby Riot, Liv Morgan and Sarah Logan interrupted a Smackdown Live Women’s Championship rematch between Charlotte Flair and Natalya. The impact of Riot, Morgan and Logan’s move from NXT to the WWE main roster was muted by doing the same thing that Paige, Rose and Deville did the night before—shitkick the other women on the roster.

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