Guts Club Spills Her Guts

Despite the warm, welcoming inclusivity of the name, Guts Club is a party of one. Lindsey Baker moved to New Orleans a little over a year ago from Philadelphia by way of Brooklyn, bringing to the South her unique brand of outsider folk or raw country. She doesn’t care what you call it; she really just wants to sound like Vic Chesnutt. “In my heart, I feel like I’m singing country songs,” she says.

How New Orleans is Jazz Fest? Part 5

Kvetching about Jazz Fest is a spring tradition as beloved as cobbling together a Mardi Gras costume on Lundi Gras night. When the rejection letters go out, artists share the bad news on Facebook that the festival will go on without them, which prompts friends and fans to clutch their ePearls and shake their eFists at the Acura-zation of Jazz Fest. 

Royal Teeth Return with "Kids Conspire"

Louisiana rock/pop band Royal Teeth have been best known over the last few years for its giddy onstage energy and "Wild," the song that more or less codifies its sound. Shiny, new wave textures and infectious, often wordless choruses give listeners ways to connect to the band and "Wild" particularly almost instantly. Because of that, The song first released in 2012 got second, third and fourth lives as it was licensed for 10 commercials or PR campaigns, and in 2014 Royal Teeth played it on American Idol.

Searching for Clifton Chenier

The structure of Todd Mouton’s book Way Down in Louisiana tells you what you need to know. The book is subtitled “Clifton Chenier, Cajun, Zydeco, and Swamp Pop Music,” and if you look at the book from the side you see a thick series of red pages in the middle. That is Mouton’s biography of Clifton Chenier, and as the rest of the book shows, Chenier is at the heart of music from South Louisiana, just as he is at the heart of the book.

Dustan Louque is Finding His Place in New Orleans

[Updated] I struck a nerve with Dustan Louque

When the Atlantic Records’ imprint Lava released his 2004 album, So Long, he was presented in a press release as simply “Louque”—a Louisiana artist who called his music “faya,” a blend of “dub, dancehall, electronic and alternative music.” So Long, the press release announced, was “bar none, one of the sultriest albums of 2004.” 

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