TroyBoi Goes Global at Buku

[UPDATED] Electronic dance music found its first home in underground clubs, secret parties, and developed outside of the mainstream. People that wanted to hear live electronic music had to attend secret raves in covert venues. Its founding fathers were black Detroit artists Kevin Saunderson, Juan Atkins and Derrick May, but now that the music verges on mainstream, it is likely that you will hear The Chainsmokers or Calvin Harris on the radio during your commute to work, in TV commercials, at sporting events, and even in restaurants.

The High Llamas Rattle the Trees

Part-time Stereolab collaborator Sean O'Hagan has found full expression of his Beach Boy impulses as well as his love of low-tech drones in The High Llamas. Almost everything the band does can be summed up by the title of its 1998 album, Cold and Bouncy. There's a remoteness in the band's love of retro electronic elements and an organic warmth in its Smile-like orchestrations.

Tales Discusses Cocktails' Pasts and Future

When I drank a Vesper Thursday, it occurred to me that I’d never been served more deliberately mediocre drinks than I was at this year’s Tales of the Cocktail. Largely, it was the luck of my panel choices. I knew what I’d get when I attended a talk on Bourbon Street cocktails, but the Vesper—gin, vodka, Lillet, and lemon peel—was an unexpected byproduct of Phil Greene and Simon Ford's discussion of the drinking of Ian Fleming and his greatest creation, James Bond.

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