Tool, The Weeknd, Arcade Fire Top Voodoo Lineup

Last year's Voodoo Music + Arts Experience was a fraught one even before rain and mud forced it to end a day early. The presence of country rock artists The Zac Brown Band on the lineup and Deadmau5 as a festival closer seemed to be a sign that a festival that began 18 years ago as an alternative rock event had lost its way.  

Voodoo News: A Long Last Look at a Shortened Voodoo

It was a shame to have Voodoo 2015 come to an early end with Sunday lost to rain and mud, but judging by the photos organizers posted on Facebook, the grounds were at least miserable if not dangerous. And, it’s hard to imagine who made the long, slow, precarious slog out through ankle-deep damp mud at the end of the night Saturday and didn’t ask themselves if anyone was worth another day of that.

Voodoo News: Ozzy's Old School, Duke Dumont's Club-oriented Saturday night

The annual grousing that accompanies a Voodoo lineup is partly the grousing that accompanies any festival lineup (as Jazz Fest can tell you), and I suspect it’s partly a way to ask “Where is the rock?” For years there were two main, rock-oriented stages and Voodoo was undoubtedly more rock-oriented. Switching one of those to Le Plur was partly a recognition of who the audience is for festivals, but it also highlighted a basic question: Where are the rock bands?

Voodoo News: Carmine P. Filthy Plays to the Diehards

There was a time when a DJ made his name with exclusives—tracks (usually) he (sometimes she) had that no one else did that blew up the dance floor. DJs famously guarded those tracks to keep them a secret and their personal advantage. According to Carmine P. Filthy (with a Boy Named Ruth, Saturday, 2:50, Le Plur), those days are gone. A less-talked-about byproduct of the digital music revolution is that there is no scarcity.

Voodoo: Last Call for 2014

[Updated] Thoughts that we didn’t get around do during Voodoo 2014:

- Here’s a thought for Voodoo 2015. Spike the Le Carnival stage and go for something more cutting edge. It’s hard to imagine more contemporary headliners who could deliver headliner-sized audiences, and headliners are exactly that—the top of the story, but hardly the festival’s full story.

Voodoo: OutKast Broadens Voodoo and Slayer Ages Gracefully

The story Friday at Voodoo wasn’t so much OutKast as OutKast’s audience, which despite a chilling wind was at least as large if not larger than those that showed for Nine Inch Nails and Pearl Jam last year. They also seemed to have more fun, dancing for much of the show. Admittedly, OutKast’s music is more conducive to a party than the purposeful Eddie Vedder and Trent Reznor. OutKast also drew a much younger audience that was more mixed along racial and gender lines.

Voodoo: Young Epic with Crazy Horse

Festivalgoers are accustomed to a fair amount of production to keep the live experience dynamic and visual, but Neil Young and Crazy Horse made due with a silhouette of an Indian on a horse. At Voodoo, they played on a stage big enough to land a plane, but Young, bassist Billy Talbot and guitarist Poncho Sampedro huddled so close together that they'd have fit in the Circle Bar if not for the amps.

Pages