King James and the Special Men are Singles Again

[Updated] “‘Eh La Bas’ is one of the oldest songs in the New Orleans repertoire,” Jimmy Horn told Talia Schlanger on WXPN’s “World Cafe” recently. “You’ve got recordings and recordings and recordings of it going back to the beginning of recording history. It’s a New Orleans song, but it’s a Creole song. That’s Haitian Creole. That’s the islands.

Leyla McCalla Brings Her New Community to Jazz Fest

Leyla McCalla has largely conducted her career as a lone wolf, performing with just her cello or her banjo, or on occasion a second voice or instrument. Many people first encountered her as a member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, but that was a fairly intimate acoustic ensemble, and her first two solo albums—Vari-Colored Songs and A Day for the Hunter, A Day for the Prey—are defined by her instrument and singing as she explored her Haitian Creole heritage.

The Special Men Solve a 21st Century Problem with Vinyl and Alynda Lee Segarra

While the question of how to get paid in the streaming era constantly animates musicians and music fans on Facebook, a second question gets asked less often. How do musicians get people to notice their releases at all? One thing’s clear—the old model of releasing an album every year or so clearly doesn’t work in the current environment. That absence-makes-the-heart-grow-fonder theory suited record labels better than artists as it forced fans who wanted new music from an artist to buy the album that was out because that was all they were going to get for next 12 months.

The Special Men Keep it Special

[Updated] Jimmy Horn loves vinyl. “I’m a voracious eater of music,” he says. “I don’t collect it; I devour it. I consume it and shit it out. I have some records that I’ve bought 10 copies of. Some I don’t have any more but they’re burned in my memory.” It’s not surprising then, that his band - King James and The Special Men - are releasing their music as 45 rpm singles.

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