Buku, FQF Reschedule, Hogs Cancels, and the Concert Business Takes a Time Out

Two more shoes dropped in New Orleans as French Quarter Festival and the Buku Music + Art Project announced that they are postponing their events. Buku is moving the festival originally scheduled for March 20 and 21 at Mardi Gras World to the Labor Day weekend, according to a statement published on the Buku Web site. At this point, there’s no word on how much of the lineup that included Flume, Illiium, Charlie XCX, and Megan Thee Stallion will be part of the festival in September.

Coronapalooza News: Coachella Postpones, SXSW & Ultra Don't Offer Refunds

Like Jazz Fest and French Quarter Festival’s organizers, we’re still monitoring the situation. There is no new news from either festival’s producers, but here is the related news for today:

- Coachella and Stagecoach postponed - The festivals take place in Indio, California, roughly a two-hour drive east of Los Angeles, in April. On March 10, organizers Goldenvoice released the following statement: 

What Does the Cancellation of SXSW Foreshadow for French Quarter Fest, Jazz Fest?

[Updated] On Thursday, we posted a story on the possible impact of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) on Jazz Fest in New Orleans. Within a day, the story had moved enough that updates wouldn’t suffice. Three more music festivals canceled or postponed—Miami’s Calle Ocho, Tomorrowland Winter in the French Alps, and most significantly, South by Southwest (SXSW) in Austin.

Essence Festival Bets on Itself for 25th Anniversary

This past weekend, Essence Festival celebrated its 25th anniversary, and thinking about how differently it handled the occasion from the way Jazz Fest celebrated its 50th is instructive. Like Jazz Fest, Essence Festival played to its base—African-American women. Two of the three headliners—Mary J. Blige and Frankie Beverly and Maze—are Essence Festival regulars, and Friday’s headliner—Missy Elliott—performed a confused set in 2015 that ended with the power cut on her before she had finished. 

Saying Goodbye to Spencer Bohren

This year at Jazz Fest, Spencer Bohren finished his set in the AARP Rhythmpourium (seriously!) with his cover of The Impressions’ “People Get Ready.” Bohren was living with prostate cancer, and it was clear that the cancer was winning. In that context, the song’s “train to Jordan” lyric rang with extra significance, but that’s not where he was going with the song. Instead, he introduced it by pointing out the lines that gave the song resonance during the Civil Rights Movement.

Dr. John and the Importance of Making Groceries

Dr. John’s most enduring mode was translator of New Orleans. He covered a few careers’ worth of musical ground and was never simply anything, but after 1972’s Gumbo, that was his gig—to help the rest of the country understand his hometown. Its history, its reality, and its romance. That role resonated in a way that psychedelic explorer of the alternative spiritual planes didn’t, and it was a role that left him room to grow.

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