Girlpool Connects with Vulnerability and Friendship

In the middle of Girlpool’s show last week at Republic, guitarist Cleo Tucker laughed at her bandmate and best friend Harmony Tividad as the two joked about how amazing it would be if Starbucks had a gas station. The audience, a modest crowd clad in baggy jeans, button up shirts, and grunge hair styles, giggled along with the band.

Zack Villere Tries to Figure Out What's "Next"

When I interviewed electronic artist Zack Villere in 2016, he saw a future as a singer. 

“There are so many different facets to pop music that I can make what I want if I call it pop,” he said. “I don’t know if it’s pop like Justin Timberlake pop, but it might be. You never know what the next wave of popular music will sound like.”

Alison Crutchfield Works on Her Boundaries

When Allison Crutchfield described Tourist in This Town as a “feminist break-up record,” she meant she was revisiting one of rock ’n’ roll’s most common concepts, but her way. “I think anything I make will a feminist record because as an artist, that affects everything that I make, even though this is an album about a fucking break-up,” she says.

Day For Night Powers Through, Rain Or Shine

When you think of a music festival in 2016, an abandoned post office doesn’t generally come to mind, so when I learned that Houston’s second annual Day for Night festival would be held at the old Barbara Jordan Post Office building, I was intrigued. A quick perusal of the festival’s website offered a little more insight into the unusual location choice.

Erin McKeown Works Big and Small

When Erin McKeown realized that her career had found its level, she was able to move forward into one of her most creative periods. She’s had stretches that got the kind of attention that could take her to another level—whatever that means—but indie singer/songwriters only get so big. Big enough to tour, but not with their bands. Big enough to tour, but not to get mailbox money. It took time to make peace with that cold truth, even though she long suspected it.

Mild High Club Doesn't Mess Around

[Update] “I’m not trying to soundtrack your fucking life,” says Alex Brettin, a.k.a. Mild High Club. “This is just my thing, and if you like it, hell yeah, I hope it’s inspiring, but if you don’t, fuck off.” This statement sums up Brettin’s marketing strategy pretty neatly. He takes his music seriously, and doesn’t have time for anyone who isn’t going to listen to it that way.

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