The Internet Finds Its Crowd In New Orleans

I saw The Internet almost exactly one month before its performance in New Orleans when it opened for Gorillaz in Chicago, and I was one of the only people around me who knew the band’s music. That night, I got side eyes for knowing and singing along to its songs, but at the House of Blues recently, The Internet’s fan base was devoted. The outpouring of love and energy was unlike anything I’d ever seen, and it was clear that band members were surprised as well.

Our Spilt Milk: Carly Rae's Heartbroken at a Hotel, and the Scooby Gang's Got a Big Mystery to Solve

Carly Rae Jepsen released a new single, “Party For One,” and it’s on time and on brand. Jepsen’s brand is a combination of bubblegum pop, hopeless romantic, and self-empowered badass, and these all come through beautifully in her new song and accompanying music video. 

Voodoo News: Travis Scott Serves as a Cultural Curator at Voodoo

Travis Scott is a cultural curator. In the age of Instagram-famous rich kids and Spotify playlists, Scott has consistently identified what will be popular among Millennials. Because of that, it wasn’t surprising when Voodoo goers weren’t disappointed that he was chosen to replace the injured Childish Gambino at the last minute. Scott is as plugged into the moment in one way as Gambino is in another

Voodoo News: Lizzo Will Be As Big As She Wants To Be

It is disrespectful to describe Lizzo as “only” anything. Lizzo will perform on Saturday at Voodoo’s Altar Stage at 3:30 p.m., and she has made a name and space for herself by proving that she is more than what’s expected of her. Many people who come to a Lizzo show come for the body-positive, self-love proponent singer and rapper whose songs helped get them through their last break-up. She says that she’s more than this and proves her immense musical range in her live performances.

Lauryn Hill and The Millennials: A Love Story

The crowd for Ms. Lauryn Hill at the UNO Lakefront Arena recently countered the assumption that all her fans are nostalgic, middle-aged women. The former Fugees singer has attracted a new, younger generation of fans who interpret and respond to her seminal album through a different lens. Hill’s millennial fan base (of which I'm a member) hears The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in a musical and cultural framework that’s decidedly 2018.

Kanye's Least Convincing Role

Kanye West is the last old school rock star. Who else will go to the same crazy extremes? Who else measures the extremity of his actions by the number of TVs thrown out the window an act equates to? Coldplay’s Chris Martin and Gwyneth Paltrow got in the inevitable-therapy game when they named their child Apple, but Kim and Kanye chose North and Saint. Advantage Kanye, and there’s no other level at which Martin is in his league.  

Noname's Hall of Mirrors and Exploration of Self

Noname is masterfully ambiguous and undefinable, but on her new album, Room 25, listeners watch as she plays with the concept of defining herself anyway. She is born out of Chicago’s open mic scene and is an original blend of spoken word, hip-hop, and lullaby. Her sophomore album is a whimsical journey through her own self-exploration, one listeners feel like they are experiencing right alongside her.

Tank and the Bangas Are Right Band, Right Time

Tank and the Bangas have become one of the best stories in New Orleans music. Their growth as artists and performers has been steady, and success hasn’t come at the cost of their nerve. Instead of remaking “Walmart” again and again or—worse—simplifying their songs to make them more conventional, they’ve asked more of their audiences instead of less.

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