Wynton Writes Off Hip-Hop to Washington Post

[Updated] Tuesday, Wynton Marsalis made news when he asserted that hip-hop is more harmful to African Americans than Confederate statues. “I started saying in 1985 I don’t think we should have a music talking about niggers and bitches and hoes,” he told The Washington Post’s Jonathan Capehart on his podcast, “Cape Up.” 

Jazz Fest: The Second Saturday at the Fest and at Night

Saturday at Jazz Fest ends with Cage the Elephant and Aerosmith opposite each other at the Gentilly and Acura stages. One rocks; one used to rock. Cage the Elephant has never sounded as gloriously decadent as Aerosmith in the ‘70s, but neither has Aerosmith since the ‘70s. I realized at one point in their 1980s comeback that I cared more about what happened to Alicia Silverstone in their videos than the songs themselves, and that was that.

Jazz Fest: Terrace Martin Was Just Getting Loose

Terrace Martin’s set felt like it was just getting started when he brought it to a close Thursday at Jazz Fest. He was finding his groove, and guests Nicholas Payton and Maurice Mo Betta Brown began playing with each other and briefly teased what could happen in the show’s second hour. Unfortunately, Martin was slated for a one hour show, leaving us to speculate about what could have been. 

SZA, Smino Top a Tough Year at Buku

Buku 2018 was a bit of a dumpster fire. The new stage layout separated the Power Plant stage from the other stages by a train track which led to extreme traffic when a train passed through. Mid-performance injuries, delayed and disastrous shows, a  strange fire ignited across the river, and cancellations from Lil Uzi Vert, Ski Mask the Slump God, and Famous Dex were sadly part of this year's Buku story. Some artists came out hot; others were tired or sloppy. Here’s our look into the highs and lows of this year's Buku Fest.

Buku News: Jay Electronica was the Prodigal Son on Saturday Night

Jay Electronica was the prodigal son on Saturday night at Buku, and one of the few rappers who performed up this weekend after Lil Uzi Vert, Ski Mask the Slump God and Famous Dex no-showed. The New Orleans native rapper grew up in the “the Magnolia projects in the Third Ward slum,” to quote Electronica. Essentially homeless, he traveled between Atlanta, New York, Detroit, and Baltimore, befriending other hip-hop artists and deejays.

Buku News: Migos Barely Present on Friday Night

Migos were barely present at Buku on Friday night. The Atlanta rap trio has been churning out hits since their 2013 track “Versace" and climbed the cultural ladder to become arguably the most prominent group in music in the past few years. Their triplet rhythms, fashion sense, and dance move (“the dab”) have been adopted globally, making them a staple of American pop culture.

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