Steve Roach Goes to Work

[Updated] The stars of the music that once found themselves ambivalently under the “new age” umbrella gathered last May in New Orleans for the ZMR Awards. Few if any in attendance care for the genre label, which is a catch-all for “New Age, World, Ambient, Electronic, Solo Piano, Relaxation, [and] Instrumental” music, as the Louisiana-based Zone Music Reporter’s website announces.

The Melvins Induce Whiplash and Hearing Loss

Thrashing drums, thumping bass, crazy eyes, bubble-bath hair. The Melvins surely lived up to their reputation Wednesday night at One Eyed Jacks. Although they released their first album in the late '80s, The Melvins charisma and innovated sound has not rusted in the slightest. The performance was energized and raw, selling out the small venue to a generationally diverse crowd clad in band T-shirts and black jeans.

Dave Hill's Witch Taint Gets Black Metal Laughs

In 2004, comedian Dave Hill sent odd, sometimes confrontational emails to black metal record labels around the world for the low-rent adventure. It was an extension of a fascination he had as a kid, when as a 10 year-old he’d call the phone number he saw on a car dealership commercial to see if the guy in the ad would answer the phone. When he wrote black metal labels, he was in his early 30s and old enough to know better, but “it’s just something I would do late at night,” he says.

Voodoo News: Black T-Shirt Day A Hit at Voodoo

Saturday was Black T-Shirt Day at Voodoo with a heavy rock lineup topped by Tool, whose black T-shirts were first among impractical equals. Guitar rock is in remission and simply isn’t a force in the marketplace right now, but it still has a dedicated audience. Cage the Elephant looked like it drew as well as Tool—or close—and throughout the day, the hard rock and metal had enough detail to be engaging, unlike the army of bands playing drop-D tunings a decade ago.

Friends, Fans Remember Lemmy

A friend pointed out that part of the brilliance of Motorhead was how they cut across audiences, particularly in the early years. Metalheads, punks, glam rockers, psychedelic freaks, the curious, the trendy, and miscellaneous weirdos all showed up to see Motorhead Mach I, with Lemmy, Fast Eddie Clarke and Philthy Animal Taylor. In Motorhead, Lemmy created something that was clearly metal (though he always denied it), but it was his own thing.

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