Flipper Still Lives By its Own Rules

Punk rock specialized in confrontation, but Flipper took it to a new level. By the early ’80s, giving the middle finger to mainstream culture had become ritualized. Be faster, be snarky, and be political. Hardcore was in its infancy, and it added “be wordy and incomprehensible” to the playbook. San Francisco’s Flipper challenged the monoculture that punks found stifling, but it fought punk orthodoxy as well.

Adventure Club is Committed to 140 BPM

After waiting over an hour to be taken backstage to interview Adventure Club, I received a text from someone who introduced himself only as “Shaggy.” He told me to meet him to right of the stage if I wanted a chance to speak with the Canadian producers. I pushed through an eclectic, neon crowd and caught the eye of a man with a thick beard and an electric blue hat with the brim bent up. Shaggy waved me in and we hustled to the back of The Howlin Wolf. I was then introduced to Leighton James and Christian Srigley, the technically gifted producers that make up Adventure Club.

Lee Bains Has His Own Songs of the South

Lynyrd Skynyrd sang “Sweet Home Alabama,” but other Alabaman bands have more ambiguous relationships with their home state. The Drive-By Truckers made that inheritance—Skynyrd included—the heart of their two-CD Southern Rock Opera, and Lee Bains III and The Glory Fires’ new Dereconstructed addresses his own mixed emotions. Some critics have referred to his music as southern rock, but he’s not so sure.

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