Sinkane Called for Revolution on the Dance Floor at Gasa Gasa

[Updated] When Sinkane wants revolution, it folds The Beatles’ “Revolution” into one of its own songs, “Ya Sudan.” Frontman Ahmed Gallab went there Wednesday night at Gasa Gasa after telling the story of revolution in his home country of Sudan—the only time Gallab stopped to explain anything. Otherwise, he let his songs speak in the broadest ways, which was more effective than that might sound.

Early in the set, yeyboard player Elenna Canlas sang:

Daisy the Great Polished Millennial Frustration at Gasa Gasa

Daisy the Great performed at Gasa Gasa on August 28 to a crowd of familiar faces for one of two frontwomen, Mina Walker. Daisy the Great understands both millennial existentialism and skillful songwriting, but because this was a hometown show, the crowd was transfixed in an especially personal way. Everyone watched with pride and attention that only hometown glory can afford.

Julia Jacklin Is Comfortable In New Orleans

Julia Jacklin ended where she started. Her last stop of tour was in New Orleans at Gasa Gasa on Thursday, and she revealed to the packed venue that New Orleans holds special significance for the blossoming of the Australian songwriter's musical career. She also showed how well she understands her own talents as she performed to her exact vocal and emotional range. The Gasa Gasa audience allowed her to fill the space exactly as she needed.

Bully Does What's Natural

Alicia Bognanno’s voice is a powerful instrument, raw as sushi and stuffed with endless ennui. Her band, Bully, is a traditional 4-piece outfit—two guitars, a bass, drums—that backs Bognanno with crunchy, forceful grooves. They are currently on tour behind their second full-length, Losing, and will play Gasa Gasa Sunday night, with support from Cincinnati shoegazers Smut.

Downtown Boys Played to the Room

The context for Downtown Boys reasserts itself weekly if not daily. The band formed in 2014, two years before Donald Trump was elected president, but the Trump Administration gives the political punk band a reason to exist almost every time he or his Cabinet members open their mouths. Team Trump didn’t invent racism, sexism, transphobia, colonialism and toxic masculinity, but it uses these tools to assert the preeminent position of wealthy straight white men in the culture daily. 

Mipso Gets to the Point

Despite its mysterious name, Mipso is a remarkably plainspoken outfit. On its third album, Coming Down the Mountain, released in April, the band deals with heartbreak, homesickness, and wanderlust. The songs treat these well-trodden subjects with care, but they don’t mince words. They are clean and straightforward, rooted firmly in the folk tradition, but never overly folksy.

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