Herbie Hits Home

Jazz, like light, changes every time you look at it. No one embodies this constant flux better than Herbie Hancock, who is still alive, well, and making moves at 77. Hancock graced the Orpheum with his superhuman stylings on Sunday, and the New Orleans jazz world looked on in awe.

TroyBoi Goes Global at Buku

[UPDATED] Electronic dance music found its first home in underground clubs, secret parties, and developed outside of the mainstream. People that wanted to hear live electronic music had to attend secret raves in covert venues. Its founding fathers were black Detroit artists Kevin Saunderson, Juan Atkins and Derrick May, but now that the music verges on mainstream, it is likely that you will hear The Chainsmokers or Calvin Harris on the radio during your commute to work, in TV commercials, at sporting events, and even in restaurants.

Naughty Professor's Noah Young Previews His Debut Album

Funk/jazz/rock band Naughty Professor had a good 2016, and the band’s bassist Noah Young will start 2017 with good news of his own. On January 13, he’ll release his first solo album, Start the Reactor, and today My Spilt Milk is pleased to premiere the first video from the album, “What Have You Been Feeding This Thing?”

Elysian Feel Lift the Shade

One Dylan refuses to be honored with a Nobel. Elysian Feel has two Dylans, and it’s hard to believe either would turn down the recognition. Drummer Dylan Seals and guitarist Dylan Kidd are transplants to New Orleans from Long Island and San Jose respectively, and they’re two-fifths of a band that along with Spence Bailey, Abner Deitle, and, Kendrick Magallanes, pulls together rock, hip-hop, electronica, Zappa, and jazz fusion bordering on Chicago (the band not the city).

When is a Brass Band Not a Brass Band?

It's tempting to say that the Mainline Brass Band stretches the definition of brass band music but really, they're a brass band in name only. The group's self-titled debut album includes "B Train" with a progressive take on a parade rhythm, but the album starts more representatively with "Cleveland and the Penguin," which features John Dobry's guitar so prominently that I thought I had mislabeled the mp3 file.

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