Bobby Z Recalls The Evolution of The Revolution

Bobby Z’s pride in The Revolution is as obvious in conversation as it is justified. Prince had many bands, but The Revolution was the band. Prince’s “last band,” Z—Robert Rivkin—said in an interview, and the thought rings true. Prince may have played with New Power Generation and steady groups of musicians after The Revolution, but those musicians all signed on to play with an international star. Members of The Revolution signed on with a guy who had more talent than buzz and more buzz than sales. And, they grew together.

The NOJO, Robert Glasper Give the Horns the Best Seats in the House

When you Google “Mr. Hands,” the Wikipedia entry “Enumclaw horse sex case” is the first link, followed by the entry for Mr. Hands, a lesser-known Herbie Hancock album. So why didn’t anyone involved in the planning of the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra’s “Mr. Hands: A Tribute to Herbie Hancock ft. Robert Glasper,” a big-ticket performance last Friday night at the New Orleans Jazz Market, take a moment to reevaluate their event title?

Herbie Hits Home

Jazz, like light, changes every time you look at it. No one embodies this constant flux better than Herbie Hancock, who is still alive, well, and making moves at 77. Hancock graced the Orpheum with his superhuman stylings on Sunday, and the New Orleans jazz world looked on in awe.

Papa Grows Funk Doc at Film Fest Reveals Basic Band Truths

Josh Freund and Sam Radutzky inadvertently set a task for themselves when they decided to shoot a documentary on Papa Grows Funk. The New Orleans funk band was exactly what people thought it was—a very good, very funky band that loved to jam. It never had an obvious story though, and its members weren’t characters. Because of that, it wasn’t a natural hook for the movie, but Do U Want It? starts as a document of the love the band inspired in its fans.

History's a Part of The Meters, Shorty's Jazz Fest Finales

The annual nature of Jazz Fest makes it a perfect time to reflect on how things have changed--not just how the festival or the grounds have changed, or which musicians are no longer with us, but how the acts themselves are different. The Meters’ set Sunday exists in relation to all the other Meters and permutations of Meters members’ shows that I’ve seen—jammy ones, pop ones, metal ones, blues ones, and always funky ones.

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