Music Biz Writer Ari Herstand Learned a Lesson or Two on Frenchmen Street

Ari Herstand found the peace he needed at District Donuts. The musician who writes the music business advice website Ari’s Take had a deadline looming for a book based on his writings, but life at home in Los Angeles proved to be too distracting. When a cousin offered him his Garden District guest house for a few weeks, Herstand jumped at the chance. Once there, he developed a routine.

Miss Sophie Lee's Path to Frenchmen Street

Miss Sophie Lee didn’t start off looking to be a jazz singer. She has been on a musical path all her life, playing piano and violin as a child, and she went to a performing arts school in her native Chicago when she was five. “Love of music happened very early,” Lee says. She started taking singing lessons when she was in junior high and went to college for classical piano performance. The classical music career she’d been aimed at since childhood didn’t happen, though.

Greg Schatz Shrugs at Everything You Want

The story of Greg Schatz’s new Everything That You Wanted is told on the back cover, not the front. The disjointed, ragtag still life atop an old piano on the front suggests a junk shop aesthetic that is not quite right. The album’s not fussy or ornate, but it’s not haphazard either. There’s far too much talent on the tracks for the songs, like the photo, to seem slung together.

Jazz Fest: Luke Winslow-King was Picked by the Blues

When Luke Winslow-King released his second Bloodshot Records album, Everlasting Arms, we talked about his relationship to the blues. He plays Jazz Fest's Lagniappe Stage today at 2:05 p.m., and he'll sit in on lead guitar with Little Freddie King during his set in the Blues Tent at 12:10 p.m. 

“The blues picked me, and I’m going to go with it.”

The Sound of Smoking

When Jimmy Anselmo wanted a liquor license so that the new owners could open Jimmy’s Music Club, they had to sign a good neighbor agreement that was designed to minimize noise. “The club's patio, which must close earlier than the rest of the club, cannot have speakers, and alcohol cannot be served on the patio,” Keith Spera reported in The Times-Picayune.

The Better Question

Recently, C.W. Cannon wrote at The Lens:

We need to accept that the explosive downtown cultural renaissance that Frenchmen Street presides over is the result of a romantic vision of what New Orleans should be, more than a continuation of how it has been. Frenchmen Street represents a recreation of New Orleans in a particular version of its own image. Change, yes, shaped by myth. 

Just days before, a family member of a French Quarter T-shirt shop owner wrote me, saying

The Sound of Science

David Woolworth is quick to point out that his work is contributing to a "sound ordinance," not a noise ordinance. "There’s sound and unwanted sound, which some would consider noise," he said in an interview Monday. "The same thing you might like, somebody else might not like."

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