Voodoo News: The Killers Kept it Classic

Continuing in the Voodoo tradition of striking a nostalgic chord on Sunday, The Killers performed at the Altar stage in the final time slot of the weekend. Before the show started, it was clear that Le Plur headliner Dillon Francis outdrew The Killers, and those who came for the band were rather homogenous in demographic and commitment to the band.

Jazz Fest: Too Many People Like Elton John and Ed Sheeran

[Updated] The attendance Saturday at Jazz Fest wasn’t a record despite the speculation of some outlets, which gives those who missed the 2001 Dave Matthews Band/Mystikal debacle a sense of how unpleasant the day was. Until the last sets started, Saturday was frustrating at best and at times a little frightening.

Jazz Fest: Saturday, May 2, at Jazz Fest

After looking forward to a day of discoveries at Jazz Fest Friday, I ended up missing both Paloma Faith and Gurrumul. I hope to do better Saturday. Last year The Soul Rebels played one of my favorite sets, so I look foward to them and Big Freedia, the latter because bounce artists rarely do more than 20 minutes on their own, so I want to see if Freedia can make a full show out of the sound.

Davell Crawford has a history of being flighty, but I'm hopeful for his tribute to Fats Domino. Crawford's a dazzling pianist, but Fats' songs call less for techincal acompishment than commitment to Domino's directness. 

Although Taj Mahal remains on the schedule, he's out due to illness. Big Sam's Funky nation was rained out last week, so he'll take Mahal's spot.

Make sure you drop in Economy Hall at some point. I often grab my first bite of the day there and put on sunscreen, and that served me well yesterday when I lucked in Tom Sancton's band. Tomorrow I expect I'll hear Connie Jones over breakfast.

Big Star, Fats Domino, Nat King Cole and The Last Kamikazis of Heavy Metal at the Film Fest

[Updated] The New Orleans Film Festival started Thursday night and continues until next Thursday. Last year, Lily Keber's The Bayou Maharajah ended the festival on a local note, and this year will ended similarly when Joe Lauro’s documentary The Big Beat on the music of Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew screens at The Carver Theater.

Treme: The Fat Man

After Hurricane Katrina, Fats Domino became an even more resonant presence in New Orleans because reports of his death were premature too. I tried to interview him at that time, as did many others, but unless you happened by his house at just the right time, he didn't do them. There was a lot of speculation about the cause of his reluctance - illness, self-consciousness, some measure of stage fright being primary among them.

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