Jazz Fest: How New Orleans is Jazz Fest - A Coda

[Updated] Jazz Fest 2015 is over, and the approximately 460,000 people made it the best-attended post-Katrina Jazz Fest but still nowhere near 2001’s 650,000. During the festival, we ran a three-part series examining lineup and schedule changes over the years, and we found that the festival actually presents more New Orleans and Louisiana talent than ever because it presents more talent period—180 more artists between 1992 and 2015.

Jazz Fest: New Track Rules?

Today in The New Orleans Advocate, Mark Guarino and Jaquetta White wrote about the crowd’s experience Saturday, and in it, they reported:

In a statement to The Advocate on Sunday, festival producers said they did institute a standing-room-only policy on the track for Acura Stage performances this year, but “as with any new policy, it sometimes takes a couple of years to achieve full compliance.”

Jazz Fest: Too Many People Like Elton John and Ed Sheeran

[Updated] The attendance Saturday at Jazz Fest wasn’t a record despite the speculation of some outlets, which gives those who missed the 2001 Dave Matthews Band/Mystikal debacle a sense of how unpleasant the day was. Until the last sets started, Saturday was frustrating at best and at times a little frightening.

Elton John, The Who, Tony Bennett with Lady Gaga Top Jazz Fest Bill

To the surprise of nobody who noticed a gap in the routing for The Who’s North American tour, The Who will be one of the headliners in this year’s New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, presented by Shell. Also on the top of the marquee are Elton John, Jimmy Buffett, Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga, No Doubt, Keith Urban, Pitbull, John Legend, T.I.

Repaving a Yellow Brick Road

The 40th anniversary box set of Goodbye Yellow Brick Road includes “Elton John and Bernie Taupin Say Goodbye Norma Jean and Other Things,” a short documentary from 1973, the year of the album’s release. It’s fascinating in its hushed, mannered Britishness, full of powerful overstatement and reverence, but its era contextualizes all that. It’s fun in the way that fan-oriented artist biographies of the day are, but it inadvertently provides some insight.

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