Flipper Still Lives By its Own Rules

Punk rock specialized in confrontation, but Flipper took it to a new level. By the early ’80s, giving the middle finger to mainstream culture had become ritualized. Be faster, be snarky, and be political. Hardcore was in its infancy, and it added “be wordy and incomprehensible” to the playbook. San Francisco’s Flipper challenged the monoculture that punks found stifling, but it fought punk orthodoxy as well.

Tony Molina and Mike Krol Flew the Flag for Guitars Last Monday Night

In the battle of guitars vs. turntables, the DJs won. Electronic music flows from the days of two turntables and a microphone, and the bricolage sensibility that drove it is now manifest in the pop marketplace and indie spaces. The ultimate sign of the DJs’ success is the number of ad jingles and TV theme songs that feature electronic music. When you’re part of the wallpaper of people’s lives, you won.

St. Vincent Made a Show of Her Show at the Civic

From the start, St. Vincent made it clear that her show was a show Monday night. A stage hand pulled back the curtain on the Civic just enough to reveal St. Vincent—Annie Clark—standing alone stage left, where she stood still at a microphone and sang “Marry Me,” backed by a pre-recorded café accordion. Clark cut a severe figure in a pink vinyl dress and pink vinyl thigh-high boots with her black hair slicked back. The theatricality of that look and opening called into question what we see and hear at concert.

Voodoo News: Bantam Foxes Have a Brand New "Loser"

Bantam Foxes (Friday, noon, Carnival) display a classic love of big, fuzzy, riffy electric guitars. On the band’s new four-song Loser EP, guitars are everything, from the Nirvana boogie of “(I Wanna Move to) Texas” to the big, chorded chorus in “Left for Dead,” which gets out of the way for a full-blown, squeal it out, distortion-laden solo.

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