J Balvin Introduces Jazz Fest to Reggaeton

I was thinking a lot this weekend about things you never see at Jazz Fest, and I got two more on Sunday. A fan somehow snuck a portable speaker in—portable speakers are not on the Kermit Ruffins-voiced list of prohibited items we hear when entering Jazz Fest!—and played reggaeton in the audience before J Balvin’s set began at the Gentilly Stage. It was great to see people start their own party with their own entertainment, just as it was great to see four girls rush the stage to hug Jack Antonoff during Bleachers’ set before Balvin.

New Orleans vs. The World: MTV Babylon Edition

With its current issue, Louisiana Cultural Vistas takes on a new name, 64 Parishes. It has relaunched with a special music section tied to the Tricentennial edited by Alison Fensterstock, and it includes work by John Swenson, Michael Tisserand, Gwen Thompkins, Jennifer Odell, Matt Sakakeeny & Oliver Wang,Maurice Carlos Ruffin, and more. The topics range from “I’ll Fly Away” to a Morning 40 Federation/Galactic collaboration to Lil Wayne and Louis Armstrong to the French Opera House to Louis Prima.

Buku News: Alison Wonderland, Illenium, and New Thousand

The Buku Project starts Friday at Mardi Gras World with perhaps its most on-time lineup yet. Migos played Saturday Night Live on the weekend, and the band has five songs from Culture II in Billboard's Hot 100 (Little Xan, also playing, has one). Culture II is number three on Billboard's Top 200 album chart, which also includes Buku artists Lil Uzi Vert and SZA.

Lil Uzi Vert, Illenium, Noname Round Out Buku Lineup

The Buku Music and Art Project rounded out its lineup yesterday with the addition of Lil Uzi Vert, Illenium, Noname and another handful of names. The festival takes place March 9-10 at Mardi Gras World, and this year it rolled out its lineup in three phases. Late last year, Bassnectar, Migos, MGMT and SZA were among the dance and hip-hop artists already announced.

Flying Lotus Throws a Tantrum at The Joy

It’s not news anymore that Stephen Ellison (Flying Lotus) can be whiny. Last year, frustrated by the plight of producers in a rapper-centric hip-hop industry, he tweeted that “hella rap artists are rape artists.” His anger may have been justified, but the statement was tone deaf and prompted reputable publications to put out ridiculous think pieces like this one.

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