DJ Shub Brings Tribal Dubstep to Jazz Fest

DJ Shub makes an unlikely return to Jazz Fest Friday. The Canadian DJ and producer last played Jazz Fest in 2013 as part of A Tribe Called Red—the first act to bring dubstep to the festival. Musically, the trio were smart, funny and political as they made their Native American heritage central to their music, whether by addressing the racism of many sports mascots, or by working tribal chants and drums into their music.

Boogie T Makes Dubstep Sound Easy Before He Plays Buku

It’s easy to get caught up in Boogie T’s energy. In the little living room of his house near UNO, Brock Thornton talks as if he’s got to get everything said before it’s time to go, and it was time to go five minutes ago. The interview takes place in the days-long window between tours, and he literally was going to be off in hours on a new tour—Grand Rapids, Michigan, Chicago—before he realizes he doesn’t can’t remember the rest. “After that, I read them,” he laughs.

Buku 2017 Features Deadmau5, Travis Scott, Zeds Dead, Young Thug

Deadmau5, Travis Scott, Zeds Dead, Young Thug, Zhu, Tycho, Jauz, 21 Savage and Sleigh Bells are among the artists who’ll perform at the BUKU Music and Art Project March 10 and 11 at Mardi Gras World. Last year, BUKU focused on its core constituency—the electronic dance music audience—and had its strongest year yet.

#Mellogang: Join Or Die

#Mellogang poured into The Republic on Thursday in full force to see Marshmello. Tickets sold out and were reselling for upwards of $120, so The Republic was packed wall-to-wall. Marshmello must be doing something right if so many people are excited to see him, but I quickly learned the loyalty and scope of his fan base that night as they so easily tested the capacity of The Republic.

Last Week: Seven Lions Inspired by New Orleans

Seven Lions (Santa Barbara native Jeff Montalvo) was first recognized by the electronic music world by wining a remix contest held by Beatport back in 2012. He remixed trance heavyweight Above & Beyond's "You Got To Go" into dubstep. In the last few years, he has gained popularity by creating melodic dubstep from trance. He loves the ethereality of trance and the skin-tingling bass of dubstep.

Voodoo News: Carmine P. Filthy Plays to the Diehards

There was a time when a DJ made his name with exclusives—tracks (usually) he (sometimes she) had that no one else did that blew up the dance floor. DJs famously guarded those tracks to keep them a secret and their personal advantage. According to Carmine P. Filthy (with a Boy Named Ruth, Saturday, 2:50, Le Plur), those days are gone. A less-talked-about byproduct of the digital music revolution is that there is no scarcity.

Pages