Playing with Fyre

Two documentaries on 2017’s disastrous Fyre Festival failed to crack the nut that is Billy McFarland. Neither Hulu’s Fyre Fraud and Netflix’s Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened explain how McFarland managed to float the financing to make the festival look like it might actually happen, though in reality, it doesn’t sound like it was ever close.

Galactic's Ready Already with Princess Shaw

The 2016 documentary Presenting Princess Shaw (available on Netflix) tells the story of Samantha Montgomery, a New Orleans medical technician who becomes an online celebrity in part for her YouTube vlog, which documented her thoughts as she tried to start a career as an R&B singer, and because of her appearance in a video by an Israeli artist who combined in DJ fashion musical videos that he found online to create a new song from people who had never met.

Lily Keber Needs Help to Bring "Buckjumping" to the Silver Screen

Lily Keber is trying to finish her follow-up to Bayou Maharajah, her 2013 James Booker documentary, and she’s looking for Kickstarter help to finance the final steps. The new film, Buckjumping, explores the world of New Orleans’ second line dancing, and that comes with costs. “We need things that sound tedious and boring, but that are super important,” she says.

Our Spilt Milk: Punk is D.O.A.; "Raffish" Writers Look for Self-Realization

D.O.A.: A Right of Passage is a guerrilla film down to the spelling mistake (I assume) in its title. The 1981 documentary on British punk by Lech Kowalski appears to have been improvised, starting with its pretentious opening with a bird’s eye view of a child being christened, juxtaposed with a woman with chipped nail polish putting a stack of singles on a turntable.

Hari Kondabolu Wants Answers for Apu

Will Hari Kondabolu get satisfaction? That’s the story behind The Problem with Apu, the comedian’s documentary that premieres Sunday on Tru TV. Kondabolu credits The Simpsons for helping him realize that comedy could be smart, subversive and funny, but he has a big problem with the show’s convenience store clerk Apu Nahasapeemapetilon.

Papa Grows Funk Doc at Film Fest Reveals Basic Band Truths

Josh Freund and Sam Radutzky inadvertently set a task for themselves when they decided to shoot a documentary on Papa Grows Funk. The New Orleans funk band was exactly what people thought it was—a very good, very funky band that loved to jam. It never had an obvious story though, and its members weren’t characters. Because of that, it wasn’t a natural hook for the movie, but Do U Want It? starts as a document of the love the band inspired in its fans.

A "Serenade" Plays New Orleans Film Fest

Documentary producer and director Owsley Brown was not looking for a movie when he arrived in Port-au-Prince. He found himself at the Sainte Trinité Music School and was immediately struck by it. Brown remembers an indescribably welcoming feeling that he couldn’t explain but knew immediately he had to capture on film. Here the roots of Serenade for Haiti began.

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