Treme: The Wind-Down

[Spoiler Alert] I wonder if I would have felt less impatient with this week’s episode of Treme if I didn’t know that there are only two episodes to go. But I do, which made Davis’ (Steve Zahn) concerns about live music on North Rampart Street feel like a story that can’t possibly pay off. Similarly, unless Toni (Melissa Leo) can make the criminal justice system move at a pace it has yet to achieve in real life or the show, we’re not going to see the end of the wrongful death suit she’s bringing.

Treme: The Company You Keep

[Spoiler alert] The oddest element of this season of Treme so far is that the episodes don’t feel like they’re moving any closer to the end of a season or show. Even previous seasons accumulated some momentum as they neared the finale, but the show remains deliberately casual in its pacing and seems to add storylines instead of winnowing them down. 

Treme: The Beginning of the End

[Spoiler Alert] Treme returned Sunday night for its final semi-season, one thing I admired about the most recent episode is that David Simon and Eric Overmyer are sticking to their guns at every level. The show's very specific pacing continues as if they've got another season or two instead of a final five episodes. Some scenes seem to casually set up stories that will be hard to wrap up, while others are more about the moment than any story.

Andy Kaufman vs. Everybody

Fight Night: Last week, Drag City released Andy and His Grandmother, an album of conversations comedian Andy Kaufman recorded with a micro-cassette recorder in the late 1970s. First response: Jeez, Andy Kaufman must have been tough to live with. His level of commitment to his comedy is likely unrivaled, but for the family and friends who didn't choose that path, being forced to be a part of his audio verité had to be exhausting.

Treme: The Wrong People

[Updated] [Spoiler Alert] "When people start thinking that money is the fuckin' answer, you get a whole 'nother set of problems," Big Chief Albert Lambreaux (Clarke Peters) says in the concluding episode of Treme. "Money didn't make New Orleans, not the New Orleans I know, anyway. And money alone ain't going to save it." The relationship between money - or more accurately, the culture that surrounds those who really know how to make it - and New Orleans was one of the major themes this season, just as it was post-Katrina.

Treme: Our World

[Updated] In my interview Saturday with Eric Overmyer, he referred to Treme as sui generis, and it is in ways he discussed and ways he didn't. Its merger of the real and fictional is likely unprecedented, as is the extensive use of music. But it's also hard to think of a show that included its producers' affections so baldly. Musical acts, for instance, are written into the show because Overmyer and David Simon like them, even if the fit is awkward.

Treme Will Return for a Final Half-Season

"We are going to be back for a season 3.5," Treme producer David Simon announced Saturday night at the Joy Theater. "HBO on viewing the 10 that we gave them and where we left it, they want to see the end of the story. There are people there who fought very hard to give us half a loaf, and we're going to take it and run.

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