The Vettes Lose Context on "Gold Star"

In 2008, The Vettes’ “Give ‘em What They Want” got airplay on B97, and you could imagine the song finding the band a national audience. It didn’t happen, likely for a number of reasons that had nothing to do with music, but it didn’t help that The Vettes’ ‘80s new wave-influenced dance rock wasn’t in style at the time. That year also gave us Sara Bareilles’ “Love Song,” Lil Wayne’s “Lollipop,” Katy Perry’s “I Kissed a Girl,” and Coldplay’s “Viva La Vida,” all of which were on a different musical page.

Poptone Revisits Tones on Tail in Family Show

Daniel Ash doesn’t put it in so many words, but his current band, Poptone, is an Ash/Kevin Haskins cover band. It exists to play the songs he and Kevin Haskins recorded in the early 1980s as Tones on Tail, which is the musical incarnation Ash is proudest of. In concert, its setlist also includes songs they wrote in Love and Rockets and Bauhaus (a few). He has no plans for the band’s future. 

Voodoo News: LCD a Soundsystem First, and Kendrick Lamar Goes Solo

When LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy sang, “I can change, I can change / if it helps you fall in love” Friday night, nothing made you think he would. It’s not that Murphy was a cad, though. On the opening night of Voodoo 2017, it became clear that LCD Soundsystem songs are construction puzzles. How do you fit together drums, keyboards, percussion and vocals to construct hypnotic dance rock grooves?

Crystal Castles Start Over

When Crystal Castles played Buku last spring, the duo’s electroclash set did everything right, but it still had an icky undercurrent. Vocalist Alice Glass had left the duo and implied that musical partner Ethan Kath was abusive in unelaborated-upon ways, and Kath appeared to have replaced her with another blonde woman who yelped his songs in similar ways.

The Ting Tings Wreck Their Lives

Jules De Martino of The Ting Tings wants people to know that they’re a real band, not the creation of the pop machinery. “Everybody thinks that it was this attempt to be a manufactured pop band to make some money, but it wasn’t,” he says, “it” being their signature hit, “That’s Not My Name.” 

“It was us having a fucking good ol’ moan about how things are.”

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