DC Super Hero Girls Introduce a New Generation to Comics

At one end of the DC Extended Universe lie the movies, a dark, heavy, Zack Snyder-influenced place defined by desaturated colors and humorless remakes of classic rock songs. Since 2009’s Watchmen, Snyder has translated comics to the movie screen with a very literal hand, treating Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, and Flash as godlike creatures, then giving the films an epic look and style appropriate for god war. Wonder Woman escaped the shroud of gloom, and its title character is central to a less angsty corner of DC’s world.

Michael Tisserand's Krazy Story Reaches from New Orleans to Coconino County

Michael Tisserand’s road to Krazy was not a fast one. He knew that George Herriman, the comic strip artist who created the classic “Krazy Kat" was from New Orleans, and although Herriman had been cagey throughout his lifetime about his ethnicity, Tisserand suspected that he was African American, even though Herriman identified as white.

Peter Kuper Finds a New Artistic Home in "Ruins"

[Updated] It’s tempting to neatly divide comic artist Peter Kuper’s work. Ruins looks like his love gig—a graphic novel that tells the story of a couple that visits Oaxaca during a teachers’ strike that turns violent—while Mad’s Spy vs. Spy is the money gig Kuper has been doing for 19 years now. He doesn’t own Spy vs.

Who's Who, and Other Tales from Comic Con

What did we learn at the Wizard World Comic Con this weekend? Just how big Doctor Who is, for one thing. The presence of the most recent Doctor, Matt Smith, certainly helped to lure a legion of fans of all ages of British science fiction series to the Morial Convention Center, many dressed as one Doctor or another, the ones with good hair dressing like Smith.

Neal Adams Fights the Bulk

In the 1970s, Jack Kirby and Neal Adams were the two gravitational poles of comic book art. Kirby’s work was all space-aged, visual dynamics, with cosmic impact in every brush stroke, while Adams’ work was far less obviously stylized. His figures were less blocky and musclebound than those of his peers and certainly less so than those drawn by Kirby, whose superheroes were often costumed tanks.

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