Dave Rosser on the Value of Being a Good Hang

[I was sad to wake up this morning and learn that Dave Rosser’s battle with colon cancer has come to its inevitable end. My thoughts are with his family, friends, and all the people he touched along the way. Here is an encore presentation of the story we ran in 2014 when he played The Circle Bar with his own band, The Get Busy.]

New Orleans Musicians Show Love and Support for Lil' Queenie

For season one of HBO’s Treme, music supervisor Blake Leyh wanted to include a performance by Lil’ Queenie, but the show aimed for chronological accuracy and she wasn’t in New Orleans when the series’ story started in late 2005. Leigh “Lil’ Queenie” Harris had been a talent big enough to be known solely by her nickname before Katrina, but since she never moved back after evacuating, her voice and presence has been absent from the new New Orleans. 

The Dick Dale Chronicles: What Keeps Him Alive

When I read surf guitar hero Dick Dale’s memories in this series, I see the thoughts and recollections of someone who has been a physical, assertive man dealing with his decline. You don’t hear it when he plays. His guitar sound remains a richly textured, driven rumble, but as he approaches 80, it’s easy to imagine that his world and social circle are shrinking.

Friends, Fans Remember Lemmy

A friend pointed out that part of the brilliance of Motorhead was how they cut across audiences, particularly in the early years. Metalheads, punks, glam rockers, psychedelic freaks, the curious, the trendy, and miscellaneous weirdos all showed up to see Motorhead Mach I, with Lemmy, Fast Eddie Clarke and Philthy Animal Taylor. In Motorhead, Lemmy created something that was clearly metal (though he always denied it), but it was his own thing.

Voodoo News: Ozzy Osbourne on His Friends

I haven’t found Ozzy Osbourne (Saturday, 9:30 p.m., Altar) menacing or scary since the early years of Black Sabbath. There was something slightly menacing in his broad grin and arch voice, particularly when paired with the relentless heaviness of the band. For most of his solo career, any darkness was mitigated by his legend, which became as heavy as Sabbath to pull around.

Win Tickets to See Morrissey

Last fall, Morrissey revealed that he had underwent a series of cancer treatments. With typical Morrissey flair for the dramatic, he said:

If I die, then I die. And if I don’t, then I don’t. Right now I feel good. I am aware that in some of my recent photos I look somewhat unhealthy, but that’s what illness can do. I’m not going to worry about that, I’ll rest when I’m dead.

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