The WWE's Elias Walks Back to New Orleans on Monday Night

One of the storylines going in the Wrestlemania last April in the Superdome was that WWE Superstar John Cena wanted a match with the beloved, retired Undertaker, and because that match wasn’t made, the only way he could be at Wrestlemania was in the audience as part of the crowd. He sat in the second or third row at ringside, even during the dark matches before the official start of the show. At one point during the show, Cena jumped from his ringside seat, hopped the barricade, and ran backstage, making everybody think that he got word that The Undertaker was there.

Robert Gordon's Memphis Rent Party Comes to New Orleans

Writer and filmmaker Robert Gordon has made a career of documenting Memphis’ music and the underground culture associated with it. In 1995’s It Came from Memphis, he folds disc jockey Dewey Phillips and professional wrestling into an account of the music scene that swerves noticeably around the city’s two biggest successes—Sun and Stax Records.

Voodoo News: Benjamin Booker Breaks Boundaries

Benjamin Booker’s sound is tougher to pin down than it used to be. His first, self-titled album was a high-powered gut punch, 44 minutes of harsh, low-fi blues punk that blew the world away with its raw explosiveness. His latest project, Witness, which came out in June, is a different animal entirely. It’s tamer in terms of unchecked energy, but sonically, it’s much more adventurous. Booker is bringing his new songs to Voodoo, where he’ll play the South Course stage at 6 p.m. Friday.

Thundercat Drops "Drunk" Before Buku, While Benjamin Booker Bears Witness

Stephen “Thundercat” Bruner is one of the best bassists in the universe, but he is arguably better known as a goof than a god. His bromance with Eric Andre, his absurdist Adult Swim-style videos and the fact that he’s usually dressed like he’s on his way from a Renaissance fare to a cosplay convention only exacerbate the situation.

Boogie T Makes Dubstep Sound Easy Before He Plays Buku

It’s easy to get caught up in Boogie T’s energy. In the little living room of his house near UNO, Brock Thornton talks as if he’s got to get everything said before it’s time to go, and it was time to go five minutes ago. The interview takes place in the days-long window between tours, and he literally was going to be off in hours on a new tour—Grand Rapids, Michigan, Chicago—before he realizes he doesn’t can’t remember the rest. “After that, I read them,” he laughs.

Luke Winslow-King Unveils His "Troubles"

If there’s a knock against Luke Winslow-King’s blues, is that they sometimes betray study carrel pallor. He’s adept at swinging, acoustic pre-war blues, but that facility comes with some clear deliberation. Sadly, it took divorce-level heartache for him to find the more organic and sometimes heavy version of the blues evident on I’m Glad Trouble Don’t Last Always, which is out today on Bloodshot Records. 

A Killer Single Introduces the World to Seratones

The short story behind Shreveport’s Seratones is that the members met in a punk club and came together to make a flame-throwing version of garage R&B. It’s a sound that dates back to the MC5, but it’s a bracing, exhilarating sound each time someone revisits it, particularly with A.J. Haynes’ soul shouter vocals up front. Her performance on “Necromancer,” their most recent single on Fat Possum Records, makes you want to go find that Shreveport punk club to see what else might be happening there. 

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