Old Crow Medicine Show Shows its Love for "Blonde on Blonde"

I’ve been more interested in Bob Dylan live than on record since I saw him remake “Maggie’s Farm” as punk zydeco at the Saenger one time. The afterlives he gives his songs speaks to the punk in me because they inevitably piss off the faithful who just want to hear him play his songs “right,” and because those interpretations open up facets of the song. Not all alterations are radical or contrary. When he sings “Like a Rolling Stone” these days, he usually does so with more charity than he once did.

Travers Geoffray Disbands Mississippi Rail Co., Makes Solo Debut at Jazz Fest

Mississippi Rail Company took a game stab at classic New Orleans R&B along with a number of related southern, piano-driven R&B styles. The band got warm but never hot, so when I received an email announcing a new album by Travers Geoffray, the leader of Mississippi Rail Company, I wasn’t surprised.

A Train Brings the Two Jons to New Orleans

It’s telling. If jam/jazz/funk fans want to tie their music and their vacation together, there’s the Jam Cruise, where sun and laid-back vibes are built into the concept. Americana fans get Roots on the Rails, where they tap into the nostalgia that trains evoke and travel from famed city to famed city, accompanied by a few singer/songwriters or small bands. Parties don’t come more bookish.

Register to Win Tickets to Case/Lang/Veirs

“Although [k.d.] lang has said they didn’t start with a theme, much of case/lang/veirs stems from this idea of relationships as wholesome forces,” writes Pitchfork critic Laura Snapes. “They” are Neko Case, k.d. lang, and Laura Veirs, who came together to release a collaborative album. “More than once, the presence of someone else is a revivifying power, peeling whoever’s singing away from the ledge, up off the rug.

Guts Club Spills Her Guts

Despite the warm, welcoming inclusivity of the name, Guts Club is a party of one. Lindsey Baker moved to New Orleans a little over a year ago from Philadelphia by way of Brooklyn, bringing to the South her unique brand of outsider folk or raw country. She doesn’t care what you call it; she really just wants to sound like Vic Chesnutt. “In my heart, I feel like I’m singing country songs,” she says.

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